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Changing SYS and SYSMAN Passwords in an Oracle RAC Environment

Changing SYS and SYSMAN passwords will not effect RAC functionality at all.
The following instructions are suitable for Oracle 10g+ running on a Windows environment.

Changing SYS Password on RAC Nodes:

On each node, replace the word password with your desired password. Depending on your configuration, some components of RAC may use embedded passwords (db_links, listener passwords, etc.).

On each node, do the following...

It is a good idea to check the date\time of the password file for each node.
The password file usually appears under %ORACLE_HOME%\database\ path and is called PWDnodeN.ORA
The date\time should reflect the time when the password changed on that node.

Examine the Oracle alert logs for any issues.

Changing SYS Password on ASM:

If you are using ASM then here is how to change the password for SYS.

Determine the location of the password file for each node.
It usually appears under %ORACLE_HOME%\database\ path and is called PWD+ASMn.ORA

On each node, do the following...

Check the date\time of the password file for each node.
The date\time should reflect the time when the password changed on that node.

Examine the ASM alert logs for issues.

Changing SYSMAN Password for Oracle Enterprise Manager (OEM):

If you are using Oracle Enterprise Manager (OEM) then you can change the SYSMAN password by doing the following:

Stop OEM on each node...

OR...

Change the password once on one node only...

Now you need to set OEM to use the new SYSMAN password.
On each node, do the following...

Start OEM on each node...

OR...

Test OEM by logging in as SYSMAN.

Changing SYS Password on Data Guard Standby Server:

Determine the location of the password file for each Standby node.
It usually appears under %ORACLE_HOME%\database\ path and is called PWDinstance.ORA

Recreate password file on standby database using orapwd utility.
The password needs to be the same as used in Production RAC nodes.

OR...

Copy the password file from the Primary database node to the Standby database node.

Check the date\time of the password file.
The date\time should reflect the time when the password changed.

Examine the Oracle alert logs on the Standby server(s) for any issues.

Caveats:

You should test these instructions on a Test system before applying into Production.

If you have used passwords in scripts and batch files, then don't forget that you need to change them too.

Some instructions state that if the value of the "remote_login_passwordfile" parameter in the pfile or spfile is EXCLUSIVE, then you must shut down your instance.